He hoped thereby to impress the court and to intimidate them.Maybe, my presence here is meant only as a threat, intending to bring those to their senses whom it ought to intimidate.He had expected to intimidate our hero easily, and now he was nonplused.

intimidating thesaurus-50

These kisses however, which she had not had the strength at first to resist, began to intimidate the young girl.

Blandishments will not fascinate us, nor will threats of a "halter" intimidate.

Ariovistus sent thither about 16,000 of his light troops and all his cavalry, to intimidate the Romans and impede the works.

means to intentionally say or do something which would cause a person of ordinary sensibilities to be fearful of bodily harm.

It is not necessary to prove that the behavior was so violent as to cause or that the victim was actually frightened.

Intimidation (also called cowing) is intentional behavior that "would cause a person of ordinary sensibilities" fear of injury or harm.

now guilt, once harbored in the conscious breast, intimidates the brave, degrades the great.

[1913 Webster] Now guilt, once harbored in the conscious breast, Intimidates the brave, degrades the great. Syn: To dishearten; dispirit; abash; deter; frighten; terrify; daunt; cow.

See {Timid}.] To make timid or fearful; to inspire of affect with fear; to deter, as by threats; to dishearten; to abash.

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co.

It is not necessary to prove that the victim was actually frightened, and neither is it necessary to prove that the behavior of the person was so violent that it was likely to cause terror, panic or hysteria.