About three years ago, I was sitting with a female friend in a bar on a frantic Saturday night in Dublin.By the end of the night, several worse-for-wear men had wandered in our direction and attempted – some more ably than others – to strike up a conversation.

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It seems that in searching for Mister (or Ms.) Right, we often ignore the potential of Mister Right In Front Of Us.

In one sense, online dating platforms have done much good.

They’ve taken our immediate social circle out of dating, so you can do what you want without ever having to deal with the judgement of a peer group.

Slightly embarrassed at the prospect of admitting in a public sphere that I would actually like to meet a man, I’d put off signing up to dating apps.

But I’d had enough of weird, often obnoxious strangers.

Surely, I thought, being able to “swipe” through potential prospects prior to meeting them would minimise the agonising tension of rejecting or being rejected face-to-face, and eliminate complete mismatches.

Online and app-based dating has changed the way we interact with each other.

We’ve moved on from discomfort or embarrassment about using technology to connect with other people.

There’s a whole generation of millennials who use dating apps as a matter of course, and it makes sense that we think a bigger pool increases the likelihood of finding someone we’re actually compatible with.

One in four relationships now start online, and that number will only increase.

However, research seems to suggest that vast choice – although alluring – actually works against us, and that online dating compounds our biases rather than challenging them.