“If one, because of one’s sincerely held moral beliefs, whether it be Jew, Muslim, Christian, Catholic, opposes the idea of same-sex marriage in Canada, is that considered ‘hate’? This is a section under which no defendant has ever won once the allegation has gone to tribunal — the next stage of the process. The CHRC is using section 13 of Canada’s Human Rights Act to investigate the priest.

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We investigate complaints based on the circumstances and the details outlined in the complaint.

And …if…upon investigation, deem that there is sufficient evidence, then we may forward the complaint to the tribunal, but the hate is defined in the Human Rights Act under section 13-1.” In other words, individual Jews, Muslims, Catholics and other Christians who, for reasons of conscience, hold to their faith’s traditional teaching concerning marriage, could very well be guilty of promoting hate in Canada.

The same is true of any faith community in Canada that does not embrace this modern redefinition of one of the world’s oldest institutions — a redefinition that even the highly-secularist France rejects.

I have interviewed van Dusen in the past and he has always struck me as an honest person willing to field tough questions on behalf of the commission.

If he feels an accusation against the commission is hogwash, he states so plainly.

If he feels the CHRC and its personnel are being unfairly tainted, he states so boldly.

Yet van Dusen did not dismiss the question out-of-hand as I thought he would. Vere,” he said, “we don’t set public policy or moral standards.

In contrast, the commission provides free legal assistance to the complainant. Father defended the Church’s teaching on marriage during Canada’s same-sex ‘marriage’ debate, quoting extensively from the Bible, the Catechism of the Catholic Church, and Pope John Paul II’s encyclicals.

Each of these documents contains official Catholic teaching.