The handoff took place at the Country Aire Mobile Home Park, where the Easons lived in a trailer.No attorneys or child welfare officials came with them.The Puchallas simply signed a notarized statement declaring these virtual strangers to be Quita's guardians. It was the first and the last time the couples would meet.

After a sheriff's deputy helped remove the Easons' second child, a newborn baby boy, the deputy wrote in his report that the "parents have severe psychiatric problems as well with violent tendencies." • The Easons each had been accused by children they were babysitting of sexual abuse, police reports show.

They say they did nothing wrong, and neither was charged.

• The only official document attesting to their parenting skills – one purportedly drafted by a social worker who had inspected the Easons' home – was fake, created by the Easons themselves.

MOTIVATED MOM: In her time seeking children on the Internet, Nicole Eason has referred to herself as Big Momma and Momma Bear.

Her term for informal custody transfers is "non-legalized adoption," and she defines the phrase to mean: "Hey, can I have your baby?

" REUTERS/Samantha Sais Part 1: When a Liberian girl proves too much for her parents, they advertise her online and give her to a couple they’ve never met. KIEL, Wisconsin – Todd and Melissa Puchalla struggled for more than two years to raise Quita, the troubled teenager they'd adopted from Liberia.When they decided to give her up, they found new parents to take her in less than two days – by posting an ad on the Internet.Nicole and Calvin Eason, an Illinois couple in their 30s, saw the ad and a picture of the smiling 16-year-old.They were eager to take Quita, even though the ad warned that she had been diagnosed with severe health and behavioral problems.In emails, Nicole Eason assured Melissa Puchalla that she could handle the girl."People that are around me think I am awesome with kids," Eason wrote. 4, 2008, the Puchallas drove six hours from their Wisconsin home to Westville, Illinois.